Fog, Cantaloupes, and Dongola in Yanceyville North Carolina

 

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Top:  An old service station at a traffic intersection that features one of only two traffic lights in the entire county.  No longer offering service, the site is now a weekend flea market.  Many items have been appropriated as tables in which vendors can show offer their wares.  The aqua blue object in the photograph is not a swimming pool, nor an air hockey table.  It, if you will remember, is a produce display stand for a supermarket.  Usually found as an island in the produce department, not a wall display, I can imagine this stand full of cantaloupes, or sweet potatoes, depending on the season.  The misty silver trim, affixed with screws around the edge, is the same trim found on fifth-wheel camping trailers, mobile homes and above ground swimming pools of the 60’s and 70’s era.

Bottom:  “Dongola,” a massive plantation house, said to be the tallest in a county full of grand plantation homes.  The brick house, completed in 1838, is not in the rural area of the county, but at the end of Main Street in Yanceyville, its massive land holdings once streaming out behind the house for miles and miles.  The house was built for Jeremiah Graves, one of the wealthiest tobacco growers in a county where bright leaf tobacco was born.

As towering as the house is, it is dwarfed in the photograph by an oak tree much closer to the camera.  The oak is healthy and thick, despite being hacked at repeatedly at the intersection of the trunk and where the tree begins to crown.

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3 thoughts on “Fog, Cantaloupes, and Dongola in Yanceyville North Carolina

  1. You’re making me homesick with all these photos Chip. Let’s plan that Julian / Kimesville trip for sometime in May or June. See you soon. -Jonny

  2. For more Dongola photographs see:

    dongola6

    For a photo of the portrait of Jeremiah Graves (1786-1868) see:

    Robert Sterling Graves (1870-1962)

    Rick Frederick
    Archivist and Webmaster
    Caswell County Historical Association

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